Covering court

With thanks for contributions from Leanne O’Donnell (@mslods / mslods.com),  Virginia Leighton-Jackson and Griffith University media freedom interns

Mobile phone destroyed after recording – INDIA

By Virginia Leighton-Jackson

A man in a local court in India has fallen afoul of the country’s contempt laws by recording proceedings on his mobile phone.

The man was the son of the appellant in the case, and was said to have been recording the case for his father.

The phone was destroyed so that no information could be recovered.

Source:

The Hindu, 26.03.2015, “Recording court proceedings proves costly”, The Hindu, available: www.thehindu.com/news/cities/chennai/recording-court-proceedings-proves-costly/article7033806.ece

 

—-

Embracing technology – Victoria Chief Justice discusses uptake and use of new technology in the justice system

By Virginia Leighton-Jackson

Marilyn Warren AC, Chief Justice of Victoria has released a report on the use of technology in the courts and possible barriers to future uptake.

The paper explores the idea of a digital courtroom via the use of Skype or other VOIPs, and the current use of services including online filing systems and storage and limited use of video conferencing.

It is noted that development and uptake is low and has not been uniform throughout the states and territories, possibly due to reluctance of established judges, despite the push from incoming lawyers and officials.

It is important for the media to be aware of new systems in place, with some jurisdictions looking at becoming ‘paperless’, and others unwilling to migrate into an entirely electronic environment. This has impacts on how journalists access court documents and interact with court officers on and off site.

Source

Warren, M., 22.05.2015, “Embracing Technology: the way forward for the courts”, presented to the 23rd Biennial Conference of District and County Court Judges, April 18, 2015, Melbourne, available: http://www.supremecourt.vic.gov.au/home/contact+us/speeches/embracing+technology+the+way+forward+for+the+courts

One response to “Covering court

  1. Pingback: Journlaw running updates to The Journalist’s Guide to Media Law | journlaw

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s